The Kentish Knock Company The Kentish Knock Company The Kentish Knock Company
The Kentish Knock Company

Naval Officers

English Officers (S - Z)

Charles Saltonstall

Charles Saltonstall served in the Parliamentarian and Commonwealth navies. In1648, he commanded the 5th Rate Hind in the Summer Guard. In 1650, he commanded the John, a 28-gun vessel purchased in 1646. On November 22, 1650, he was in company with Richard Badiley's squadron in Cartagena Bay. By 1652, he commanded the Lion. At the Battle of Dungeness, Robert Blake accused Charles Saltonstall of not closing with the Dutch and fighting. Michael Baumber, in General-At-Sea, says that all Charles Saltsonstall did was to think for them selves, which did not suit Robert Blake. Their ships were in poor repair, and you could argue that Robert Blake was violating orders in attacking the Dutch, who were present in overwhelming numbers. That did not matter, as at first Charles Saltonstall was removed from command and imprisoned, although he was later set free. The result was that he never again commanded a navy ship at sea.


Robert Sansum

Robert Sansum's flagship at the Battle of Lowestoft was the 3rd Rate, Resolution (58 guns). Robert Sansum was killed at this battle. He had been a Rear-Admiral of the White in Prince Rupert's squadron.

During the Commonwealth, Robert Sansum commanded a number of ships:

  • From 1651 to 1653, he commanded the small frigate, the Bryer.
  • From 1654 to 1655, he commanded the 4th Rate Adventure.
  • From 1655 to 1660 (the Restoration), he commanded the larger 4th Rate, the Portsmouth.

This information is from R.C. Anderson's List of English Naval Captains 1642-1660, published by the Society for Nautical Research in 1964. I have found this to be a very valuable source.

Robert Sansum's flagship at the Battle of Lowestoft was the 3rd Rate, Resolution (58 guns). Robert Sansum was killed at this battle. He had been a Rear-Admiral of the White in Prince Rupert's squadron.

This is from Frank Fox's book, A Distant Storm: the Four Days Battle of 1666.


Jeremy Smith in the First Anglo-Dutch War

I was aware of Jeremy Smith's service in the Second Anglo-Dutch War. I had not realized that he had served in the first war. I apparently had not done a good enough job of reading the index in The First Dutch War, as I had not seen the references to him. On September 13, 1653, he was captain of the frigate Advice, 42 guns (Vol.VI, page 50). Earlier, in June 1653, he had commanded the Advice at the Battle of the Gabbard (Vol.V, p.16). On April 27, 1654, Captain Smith wrote a letter to the Admiralty Council describing the capture of the Dutch East Indiaman, the Roos of Amsterdam. He described the Roos as being about 800 tons and having 26 guns. The Roos served in the English navy as the Indian. The Indian was measured as 687 tons and carried 60 guns. The VOC website says that the Roos was a three-masted galjoot. The Indian was sold in 1660.


Henry Southwood

Henry Southwood served in the Parliamentarian, Commonwealth, and Restoration navies. We first hear of him in 1646, in command of the Warspite, a small vessel. In 1650, he again was recorded as commanding the Warspite. From 1650 to 1652, he commanded the 6th Rate Greyhound (20 guns). He fought in the first battle of the war, off Dover, in May 1652. In the fall, he was with Andrew Ball's abortive expedition to the Sound, where the Antelope was lost in a storm. He was also with Robert Blake at Dungeness. In 1653, he commanded the Dutch prize Violet (40 guns). Captain Southwood was in Samuel Howett's division at the Battle of the Gabbard. Samuel Howett was Rear-Admiral of the Red. In 1654, he commanded the White Raven. He also seems to have fought at the Battle of Scheveningen. The only mention of him after the Restoration is that he was promoted to captain in 1666.


Rowland Stepney

Rowland Stepney served in the Restoration navy. In 1665, he was appointed as lieutenant on the 2nd Rate Rainbow. In 1668, he was lieutenant on the Monck. In 1669, he was appointed as lieutenant on the Bristol. In 1671, he served as lieutenant on the Dover. He was appointed as captain of the Drake in 1672. Later in 1672, he commanded the Lily sloop. He died prior to 1689.

Sources:

  • David Syrett, R. L. DiNardo, The Commissioned Sea Officers of the Royal Navy 1660-1815, 1994.
  • J.R. Tanner, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Naval Manuscripts in the Pepysian Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge, Vol.I, 1903.

John Stokes

John Stokes seems to have not served past the Restoration, at least at sea. He held many important commands during the Interregnum, however. I have seen his name also spelled "Stoaks" and "Stoakes". 17th Century spellings seem to have been rather fluid, which complicates research.

John Stokes commanded many ships between 1649 and 1660.

  • He started in command of the Hector, in 1649.
  • From 1650-1652, he commanded the frigate Dragon.
  • In 1653, he commanded the Pelican, the Laurel, and then the Victory.
  • In 1654, he commanded the James.
  • From 1654-1655, he commanded the George.
  • In 1655, he was Rear-Admiral in the Mediterranean, and flew his flag on the Unicorn.
  • From 1656-1657, he was in the Rainbow.
  • From 1657-1659, he was Admiral in the Mediterranean, and had his flag on the Lyme.
  • In 1660, he commanded the Richard, which became the Royal James, after the Restoration.

The reference to "John Stoakes" after 1660 is on page 25 of Frank Fox's book, A Distant Storm: the four days battle of 1666. There was a Captain Stoakes who had a business pressing seaman for the Restoration navy. Peter Pett complained about the poor quality of men he had been providing. That is the last mention I have seen. If this is the same man, then he must have been judged to not have so politically unreliable that he would have been imprisoned or killed, but not so suitable as to be employed in the navy, the way that others had been.


Robert Stout

Robert Stout served in the Restoration navy. He was lieutenant on the Resolution in 1665. Later in 1665, he was lieutenant of the Revenge. In 1666, he was appointed as lieutenant of the Henry. Later in 1666, he was lieutenant of the Lion. In 1668, he was appointed as captain of the Roe ketch. In 1669, he was appointed as second lieutenant of the St. David. He served under the command of Sir Thomas Allin. In early October, he commanded four boats in an operation against North African pirates. By 1671, he was appointed as captain of the Fountain fireship. He fought in the Battle of Solebay as commander of the Fountain. A shot from a Dutch ship burnt the Fountain. Later in 1672, he was captain of the Forester. He held a series of appointments in 1673. Early in 1673, he commanded the Princess. By 21 January 1673, the King appointed him to command the Warspite. Later in 1673, Prince Rupert reappointed him to command the Warspite. In the Warspite, he fought in the Battle of the Texel in August. Finally, on 15 June 1674, the King appointed him to command the Success. He died some time before 1689.

Sources:

  • R. C. Anderson, The Journals of Sir Thomas Allin, Vol.II 1667-1678, 1940.
  • R. C. Anderson, Journals and Narratives of the Third Dutch War, 1946.
  • David Syrett, R. L. DiNardo, The Commissioned Sea Officers of the Royal Navy 1660-1815, 1994.
  • J.R. Tanner, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Naval Manuscripts in the Pepysian Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge, Vol.I, 1903.

Thomas Thompson

Thomas Thompson served the Commonwealth navy. From 1649 to 1652, he commanded the Mayflower. This seems to have been the former Irish Fame captured in 1649. In early 1652, the Mayflower carried 14 guns and had a crew of 60 men. From 1653 to 1654, he commanded the Crow, a French prize captured in 1652. Thomas Thompson, in the Crow fought at the Battles of the Gabbard and Scheveningen. In September 1653, the Crow carried 36 guns and had a crew of 140 men.


Charles Thorowgood

In 1649, Charles Thorowgood commanded the Guinea frigate. In 1650, he was Blake's flag captain on the George. In March, they were off Portugal, hoping to catch Prince Rupert's squadron. He commanded the small 3rd Rate Worcester from 1651 to 1652. Andrew has information that contradicts what Anderson writes. Charles Thorowgood commanded the Worcester at the Battle off Dover in May 1652. Blake was disatisfied with his performance, and Anthony Young was promoted to the Worcester. That seems to have been the end to his career, although Captain Thorowgood's crew petitioned for his reinstatement.


Thomas Trenchfield

We know that Thomas Trenchfield served in King Charles' navy up until the start of the Civil War. In 1642, he was captain of the 2nd Rate Unicorn (crew 260 men and 769 tons), and served in the Summer Guard for 1642. In 1646, he was a Rear-Admiral in the Parliamentarian navy, and flew his flag on the 2nd Rate Rainbow. There is a note in the House of Commons Journal for 23 February 1646 appointing him as captain of the Rainbow and as Rear-Admiral. His ship was stationed at Chatham. His ship was assigned to the Summer Guard for 1646. He died later in 1646.


John Turner

John Turner served in the Restoration navy. Andrew says that he lived from 1645 to 1672. We know that he died on 16 July 1672. The Duke of York appointed him as lieutenant of the DragonDragon in 1665. In 1666, the Duke of York appointed him as lieutenant of the Mary Rose. Later in 1666, Prince Rupert and the Duke of Albemarle appointed him as captain of the 4th Rate Expedition. In 1667, he commanded the Abraham and Sarah. In 1671, the Duke of York appointed him to command the Tiger. Corbett says tht he commanded the Tiger at Solebay. He was assigned to Sir Joseph Jordan's division in the Blue Squadron. The Duke of York appointed him to command the 3rd Rate York in 1672, apparently after Solebay. He died, as mentioned on 11 July 1672, while 27 years old. He was a very young captain. He had fought in the Battle of Solebay, so perhaps he had been wounded.

Sources:

  • R. C. Anderson, Journals and Narratives of the Third Dutch War, 1946.
  • Julian S. Corbett, A Note on the Drawings in the Possession of The Earl of Dartmouth Illustrating The Battle of Solebay May 28, 1672 and The Battle of the Texel August 11, 1673, 1908.
  • J.R. Tanner, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Naval Manuscripts in the Pepysian Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge, Vol.I, 1903.

Walter Wood

Walter Wood served in both the Commonwealth and Restoration navies. From 1650 to 1651, he commanded the Guinea frigate (34 guns). In 1653, he commanded the 4th Rate Centurion, until he was dismissed. He fought at the Battle of Portland, in February 1653. On 30 March 1653, he sailed from Portsmouth with the ships commanded by William Penn. At the Battle of the Gabbard, Walter Wood was in the Lionel Lane's (Vice-Admiral of the White) division. R. C. Anderson notes that he was dismissed, but I have not been able to find the details in The First Dutch War. We only know for certain that by December 1653, Robert Nixon commanded the Centurion. Prior to that, the Centurion had poor masts, was in need of careening, and other repairs. After the Restoration, Walter Wood was employed. He commanded the 3rd Rate Henrietta (58 guns) in Prince Rupert's division at the Battle of Lowestoft in 1665. Walter Wood again commanded the Henrietta at the Four Days' Battle. He was still in Prince Rupert's division. Walter Wood was one of the English captains killed in the battle. A total of 25 captains were killed, wounded, or captured.

The Kentish Knock Company
COPYRIGHT 2000-2008 THE KENTISH KNOCK COMPANY
The Kentish Knock Company